Butcher Reveals a Tip to Find out If Your Meat Is Fake – This Is What’s Holding It Together

Seriously when is enough enough! As if ammonia, chlorine gas, antibiotics and pink slime were not enough now we have to worry about meat glue.  Yup, you heard me right meat glue.

What is Meat Glue?

“Meat glue is an enzyme called transglutaminase. Some meat glues are produced through the cultivation of bacteria, while others are made from the blood plasma of pigs and cows, specifically the coagulant that makes blood clot.

When sprinkled on a protein, such as beef, it forms cross-linked, insoluble protein polymers that essentially acts like a super-glue, binding the pieces together with near invisible seams. The glue-covered meat is rolled up in plastic film, followed by refrigeration. Some manufacturers have gotten so proficient in the practice that even an expert butcher can’t tell the difference between a piece of prime beef and one that’s been glued together with bits and pieces of scraps!”

Meat Glue – Both Unethical and Potentially Dangerous

First, there’s the obvious issue of misleading consumers. Since food manufacturers are not required to disclose what they’ve done, you think you’re buying a prime cut when in fact you’re paying top dollar for glued-together bits and pieces that would otherwise have been discarded or sold for a fraction of the cost.

But aside from the fact that it’s a pure scam, there’s the increased possibility of contracting food poisoning from these meats.

According to the featured report, the bacterial contamination of meat glued steak is hundreds of times higher than a solid piece of steak! Hence, if you cook your steak rare, which is the healthiest way to cook your meat, you’re at a much greater risk of contracting food poisoning.

Additionally, when an outbreak does occur, it’s difficult, if not impossible, to discern the source of the contamination, as chunks of meat from multiple cows have now been combined. ”

Meat glue is reportedly widely used in the dining industry, most often wherever large amounts of filet mignon are served—big hotels, catered events, and restaurant chains. So how do you protect yourself? Follow this tip from a butcher: watch out for low prices; the next time you wonder how your preferred dining establishment is able to give away Surf and Turf for $8.99, you know you just ate meat scraps.

Watch this report showing you exactly how it’s done: